Dun Dun Dun

chicintellectual:

Dolce and Gabbana F/W 2005 runway featuring Chloe Sevigny

(Source: catleecious)

nowaywhorehey:

We’ve all had that awkward moment where we accidentally touched our friend’s boob

jensineeckwall:

Thing within a thing, a little comic that appears as part of an upcoming gallery and book project that I wish I could show you

jensineeckwall:

Thing within a thing, a little comic that appears as part of an upcoming gallery and book project that I wish I could show you

(Source: jensineeckwall.com)

(Source: flower-dust)

unteens:

people who can’t handle all black outfits are weak

superpringle:

Quick Pringle, catch the stick!

(Source: allanyadiaz)

(Source: notkool-aid)

(Source: gameraboy)

korrapted:

excuse me korra are u okay

korra your face

trust:

finally a career for me

image

(Source: trust)

If a young woman in middle school or high school hangs up a poster of Barack Obama in her room, this is seen as acceptable. It’s fine for women to admire men and want to be like them.

If a young man (the same age) hangs up a poster of Hillary Clinton in his room, this is seen as odd (maybe even troubling, is he gay? Oh no!).

Society tells us young men can’t think of women as role models, unless they’re a family member, whereas young women can admire and seek to emulate anyone, regardless of gender.

If you’re a young man, and if you have a poster on your wall with a woman, she had better be half-naked in a bikini, even if the Ronald Reagan or Gen. Patton poster next to it obviously features the man fully-clothed.

Young men are not to taught to think of women as role models. They are taught to think of them as either family members or sexual objects. There is no other category presented.

"

Charles Clymer, “Why Are We Ashamed of Our Women Heroes?”

Source: http://charlesclymer.blogspot.com/2013/02/why-are-we-so-ashamed-of-our-women.html

(via charlesneedsfeminism)

No lies told.

(via corinnestark)

Television needs shows like The Legend Of Korra. To start, it has one of the most well defined casts of females in children’s television, and they’re featured in stories that appeal to an audience far larger than the advertisers’ target. Both Avatar and Korra tackle real political, philosophical, and personal issues in ways that make the lessons accessible and enjoyable for a huge range of viewers, and it would be a true shame to lose this series because of mishandling by the network. Having seen the next episode (which was originally supposed to air tonight), I can say that this season is even more ambitious than we initially presumed, and while we’re past the halfway point of this season, the storyline of Zaheer and the Bad Benders is building to something that can’t be contained in just five more episodes. The writers are playing the long game here, and they shouldn’t be rained out when they’re performing this well."
— Oliver Sava in his review of “The Terror Within” for the AVClub. His reviews for Korra this season have been excellent and this is his best one yet, and contains good omen’s for next week’s episode, which he apparent got as a screener. (via dongbufeng)
radcanine:

Tell me a bedtime story

radcanine:

Tell me a bedtime story

(Source: awwww-cute)